Minnesota Parenting Mediation Protects Children

MN Help after a Stressful DivorceMinnesota parenting mediation helps divorcing or uncoupling parents make decisions that impact their children. At issue will be custody determination, parenting time and child support – to name just a few important topics. Since these are adult topics about children – not topics for children – parents benefit greatly from having a process to privately and thoughtfully address these issues. Minnesota parenting mediation provides the structure for this process.

When parents enter into mediation for determining issues relating to their children it is common that they will have some differences of opinion regarding issues as significant as custody labels to seemingly smaller issues such as bedtimes in each home. With the help of an experienced mediator, parents work together to make these decisions. Both parents will make concessions along the way – and in the end they will have an agreement that is truly in the best interest of their children.

Parenting mediation typically involves the parents and the mediator – and not the children.  Although the children’s best interests are a priority when creating a settlement agreement, this does not mean that children should be present for discussions about custody and visitation.  Many children experience “loyalty-tug” and feel as though they must choose between parents, causing them anxiety and even depression. If the children’s voices are necessary, a child specialist can be engaged to meet with the children privately and then report back to the parents and mediator without involving the children directly – this is called child inclusive mediation.

Parenting mediation allows parents to customize a detailed parenting plan that suits the specific needs of their children and family. Although living separately, co-parenting must continue. Parenting mediation allows the parties to determine the best way for both parents to remain active and significantly involved in the children’s lives which allows children to more successfully adjust to their new routines.

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