Divorce Affects Children How?

If you’re going through a divorce, you’re likely thinking of how your children feel about the process, how they will react to the news of a divorce, and what can be done to make divorce easier for children. At Amber M Serwat Mediation, we want to not only help you achieve a quick and successful divorce, we want to make sure that your divorce affects your children as little as possible. That said, how can we know what children are thinking, how they’re feeling, and what their concerns may be about divorce? If your child cannot open up, if you’re concerned about what your child may be feeling, and if you want to understand divorce from a child’s perspective, our Burnsville, MN divorce mediators want to help so that you can have the least stressful, healthiest divorce possible for your entire family. To take a closer look at how divorce affects children, look to a Huffington Post article titled “7 Ways Divorce Affects Kids, According to the Kids Themselves:”

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Successful Divorce With Children

It’s no secret that divorce can be challenging for everyone involved – including children. But parents still like to think that they’re doing what’s best for themselves and their children when they choose to end a marriage. If you’re worried about whether divorce is bad for children, the Burnsville, MN divorce Mediators at Amber M Serwat Mediation can help put your mind at ease. With years of experience as divorce mediators, we have seen the effects of divorce on children, and we understand how to prevent and combat those effects through healthier divorces. When thinking of the effects of divorce on children, it’s important to remember that there are both short-term effects and long-term effects of divorce, both of which can be prevented and addressed in different ways. One of the most important things you can do, though, is to understand divorce from your children’s perspective.

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How Will Your Children Remember You?

Children of DivorceWhether our memories of childhood interactions with our parents fall into the Field of Dreams category (“Hey, dad? Wanna play catch?”) or something less desirable and possibly even traumatic, what is likely true for all of us is that we are shaped by those interactions. A reality of parenting is that we have great power over our children. Their developing minds cannot yet process the kinds of subtle, nuanced communication that most adults take for granted, and that means that we must be more cognizant of our impact on our children.

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